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Quote of the Day - The first farmer was the first man. All historic nobility rests on the possession and use of land. - Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Farmers Harvest Corn, Soybeans, Hogs and Now Wind

Farming is farming, I guess.  It doesn't necessarily matter what you're farming.  It could be corn, soybeans, oats, alfalfa, shrimp, salmon, pearls, or, for that matter, let's say wind.

That's right.  Wind. 

You've heard of wind farms.  We have a couple here in California, out near Palm Springs and another one outside of Livermore.  They're even proposing one in Nantucket Bay, just off the shores of Cape Cod.  Everyone there is up in arms about it.  For that matter, many people around Palm Springs and Livermore were up in arms about wind farms before the Bureau of Land Management installed them.

Hard to believe for California, land of fruits, nuts, twigs and berries.  And environmentalists.  Purists call them eyesores.  Visual pollution.  NIMBY - you know - Not In My Back Yard. 

Whatever they are, with rising fuel prices, they are starting to make money.  Not a lot of money, say $3-5,000 per acre over 25 years.  That's not a huge return, but some estimates peg the rate of return at a fairly respectable 20%, which may drop down to 7%, if tax subsidies were lost.

In Missouri, however, farmers are adding wind to one of their crops.  The small family farm is about to go by the wayside given the cost of just about everything, consolidation into corporate farms and lower prices from imports.  Now they're going to try a new income stream.

The Missouri farmers are planting seeds that will grow into wind turbines.  Right there next to their herds, and they can still farm other crops around the 15-foot bases of the 200-foot high wind turbines.  Sounds like a win-win to this former gentleman farmer

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Saturday, November 04, 2006 at 08:34 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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