May It Please The Court: Weblog of legal news and observations, including a quote of the day and daily updates

Skip To Content

MIPTC Author:

Bookstore:



 Attorney
Categories [more]
General (1976)
Lawyer 2 Lawyer (285)
Latest Blogs
This Month's Posts [more]
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Links of Interest [more]
Locations of visitors to this page



Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.



law-blogs.net


Quote of the Day - On Thanksgiving Day all over America, families sit down to dinner at the same moment - halftime. - Unknown
Adjust font size: A A+ A++
Claim Your Profile on Avvo
An Affiliate of the Law.com Network

From the Law.com Newswire

Sign up to receive Legal Blog Watch by email
View a Sample

The First Real American Thanksgiving- A Tongue In Cheek Look At The Holiday

Thanksgiving started with the Rockettes' performance for the Pilgrims and Indians that first holiday back in 1627.  They flew them in to Plimoth Plantation from New York after the 135th annual Macy's Day Thanksgiving Parade, which had been continually performed since Columbus discovered America back in 1492, even though Native Americans already knew it was here. 

The Pilgrims' three-day feast started with the balloons, a 4,500 calorie feast, too many relatives and friends from out of town, and an afternoon of Pilgrim men watching three football games on TV (which they called stool ball, but probably bears a resemblance to cricket more than football), followed by the women cleaning up.  The Plymouth High Schools Marching Band finished off the parade, cheered on by the Pilgrims.

Their table was full of turkey, ham, cranberry sauce with the rings from the can still showing, French champagne with Martinelli's apple cider for the kids and of course pumpkin pie for desert.  Massasoit and Squanto showed the Pilgrims how to stuff the turkey, and add in lots of Caribbean rum to keep the stuffing moist and everyone happy.  They passed around the can of spray-on whip cream for those that didn't want any ice cream.  Your favorite vegan, Aunt Edna, visiting from Rhode Island, demanded her tofu turkey and tried to make everyone else feel bad for eating Tom Turkey.  Then there were the distant relatives visiting from New Orleans who brought along their new creation, turducken, combining turkey, duck and chicken all in one bird. 

Here are a few myths to round out our Thanksgiving coverage:  The Pilgrims wore buckles on their shoes (never did).  The Pilgrims were dressed all in black (that was the Puritans).  Americans invented Thanksgiving (that honor belongs to Middle Easterners from ancient times).  The Pilgrims invited a few nearby Indians to their feast (some 90 Wampanoags outnumbered the remaining 47 Pilgrims, after the first winter killed half of the migrants from England).  The Pilgrims ate plenty of turkey at that first feast (the menu included mussels and beer, bread and butter and cider, followed by pompion - Indian pudding - for dessert). 

There are plenty of other myths that surround the Pilgrims and that first Thanksgiving, but you can get the real story at Plimoth Plantation, where MIPTC must tip its hat for some of the "facts" in today's post. 

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, November 24, 2005 at 11:30 Comments Closed (0) |
 
Share Link  

 


  Text-Only Site