May It Please The Court: Weblog of legal news and observations, including a quote of the day and daily updates

Skip To Content

MIPTC Author:

Bookstore:



Listed in Latino Who's Who, June 2014
 Attorney
Categories [more]
General (1976)
Lawyer 2 Lawyer (285)
Latest Blogs
This Month's Posts [more]
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Links of Interest [more]
Locations of visitors to this page



Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.



law-blogs.net


Quote of the Day - I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. - Dalai Lama
Adjust font size: A A+ A++
Claim Your Profile on Avvo
An Affiliate of the Law.com Network

From the Law.com Newswire

Sign up to receive Legal Blog Watch by email
View a Sample

MIPTC's Book Review: Supreme Discomfort: The Divided Soul Of Clarence Thomas

If you ever wanted to understand a Supreme Court justice, and in particular Justice Clarence Thomas, then Supreme Discomfort:  The Divided Soul of Clarence Thomas gives you the insight that can only come from what appears to be a careful and long investigation into the inner workings of the man, his life and background, all ostensibly to understand his stance on the issues.

It starts with the pain he, Anita Hill and the rest of the country went through in his confirmation hearings.  It ends with a thin ray of light for Justice Thomas and all of us.  Dark in a deep way, the book paints a gloomy picture, almost bereft of hope at times.

As a lawyer, it offers an insight not normally afforded.  As a country, it's an insight I'm not sure we want.

The book lifts the roof off one of the Chambers of the Supreme Court, but it doesn't ask the question whether we should look inside.  There's a certain distance we seem to have ignored between our leaders and decision-makers, a distance lost long ago when Woodward & Bernstein peered inside Watergate and found Nixon wanting.

MIPTC doesn't advocate a return to Camelot and the blissful ignorance a pandering media offered us, but there is a respect for some level of privacy we may want to consider offering to those in power, and to ourselves.  Yes, we need a critical look at the legislation, decisions and choices made by our government leaders, but tempered with respect for their privacy, which this book tears away from Justice Thomas.

What we expect for ourselves, we may want to consider providing to everyone.

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Tuesday, May 01, 2007 at 01:58 Comments Closed (0) |
 
Share Link  

 


  Text-Only Site